CIE IGCSE English Language

Practice Papers

0%

Practice Paper 1C

Question 1a

Marks: 1

Read Text ACan a ‘happy to chat’ bench really tackle the epidemic of loneliness among the elderly? in the insert and then answer Questions 1(a)–(e) on this question paper.

 (a)  Name two people the writer chatted to on the bench.

Close

a)

Name two people the writer chatted to on the bench.

  • Ann Davies
  • Helen Brodie MBE

(no marks for Ashley Jones)

You must have 2 correct answers for 1 mark

[1 marks]

Question 1b

Marks: 4

(b)  Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i)  ‘in a bid to tackle loneliness’ (line 5):

(ii)  ‘a con artist.’ (line 9):

Close

b)

Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i) ‘in a bid to tackle loneliness’ ‘An attempt to prevent people from being on their own.

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

(ii) ‘a con artist’: A fraudster/scammer/crook/someone who defrauds a person for money

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

Question 1c

Marks: 2

(c)  Re-read paragraph 3, (‘The idea is championed by… interaction.’)

Give two benefits of the ‘happy to chat’ bench

Close

c)

Re-read paragraph 3, (‘The idea is championed by… interaction.’). Give two benefits of the ‘happy to chat’ bench

  • To offer people more human interaction/company
  • To stop people being conned/defrauded because they’re lonely

1 mark for each correct answer (max. 2 marks)

[2 marks]

Question 1d

Marks: 5

(d)  Re-read paragraphs 5 and 6, (‘I got chatting… just natural.’).

(i)  Identify two common conversation starters mentioned by Anne.

(ii)  Explain why Anne Davies uses the bench.

Close

d)

Re-read paragraphs 5 and 6, (‘I got chatting… just natural.’).

(i) Identify two common conversation starters mentioned by Anne.

  • People intrigued by the bench/asking what it’s about
  • People commenting on the bench being a good idea
  • Asking whether people are on holiday
  • Whether people visit each year

1 mark for each correct answer. 

[2 marks]

(ii) Explain why Anne Davies uses the bench.

  • She lives alone – the bench gives her company
  • She has to do it – she feels compelled to help people
  • She likes to take care of people
  • To tell people about the bench

1 mark for each idea, max. of 3 marks

[3 marks]

Question 1e

Marks: 3

(e)  Re-read paragraphs 8-10, (‘The pair have used… after all.’).

Using your own words, explain why the writer went back to London in high spirits.

Close

e)

Re-read paragraphs 8-10, (‘The pair have used… after all.’). Using your own words, explain why the writer went back to London in high spirits.

  • He can see the benefits of the bench –it allows people to talk to strangers, especially when they’re a mix of interesting people.
  • He sees how much the bench helps older, lonely people be able to speak and be listened to.
  • He finds it encouraging that people still look after each other in the community.
  • He has met people who inspire him.

1 mark for each idea, max. 3 marks. Answers which are entirely in the words of the text get no marks.

[3 marks]

Question 1f

Marks: 15

Read Text BPoignant loneliness film released by The Silver Line in time for Christmas, in the insert and then answer Question 1(f) on this question paper.

 (f) According to Text B, what made the film so emotionally moving and why was it released in time for Christmas?

You must use continuous writing (not note form) and use your own words as far as possible.

Your summary should not be more than 120 words.

Up to 10 marks are available for the content of your answer and up to 5 marks for the quality of your writing.

Close

f)

According to Text B, what made the film so emotionally moving and why was it released in time for Christmas?

Example top-grade answer:

The film gives us a snapshot into the private thoughts and feelings of someone who is alone; in this case, a widowed elderly woman celebrating what would have been her 50th wedding anniversary. It is a very poignant film, made sadder by the fact the woman speaks only four words in order for the audience to understand the feeling of despair people like her feel. The film reminds people that lonely people have a history and that their loneliness isn’t out of choice but circumstances, especially death of loved ones. It was deliberately released at Christmas, at a time which would most resonate with people, to encourage people to donate money, which the charity needs.    

Reading marks:

9-10 marks:

  • very effective answer that demonstrates a thorough understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a wide range of relevant ideas and is consistently well-focused.
  • Points are skilfully selected to demonstrate an overview.

7-8 marks:

  • An effective answer that demonstrates a competent understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a good range of relevant ideas and is mostly focused.
  • Points are carefully selected and there is some evidence of an overview.

5-6 marks:

  • partially effective response that demonstrates a reasonable understanding of the requirements of the task.
  • Demonstrates understanding of ideas with occasional loss of focus.
  • Some evidence of selection of relevant ideas but may include excess material.

Writing marks:

4-5 marks:

  • A relevant response that is expressed clearly, fluently and mostly with concision.
  • The response is well organised.
  • The response is in your own words (where appropriate), using a range of well-chosen vocabulary.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar are mostly accurate.

2-3 marks:

  • A relevant response that is generally expressed clearly, with some evidence of concision.
  • There may be some lapses in organisation.
  • The response is mainly expressed in your own words (where appropriate) but there may be reliance on the words of the text.
  • Errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[15 marks]

Question 2a

Marks: 4

Read Text CMrs Palfrey at the Claremont, in the insert and then answer Questions 2(a)–(d) on this question paper.

(a) Identify a word or phrase from the text which suggests the same idea as the words underlined:

(i)  The car drove down the wet, quiet road.

(ii)  She tried to dismiss the fear.

(iii)  All appearing quite similar.

(iv)  Excellent food.

Question 2b

Marks: 3

(b) Using your own words, explain what the writer means by each of the words underlined:

Followed by the driver and her luggage (for the hotel gave no sign of life), she battled with revolving doors and almost lurched into the hushed vestibule. The receptionist was coldly kind, as if she were working in a nursing-home, and one for deranged patients at that. ‘What a day!’ she said. The taxi-driver, lumbering in with the suitcases, seemed alien in this muffled place, and was at once taken over by the porter. Mrs Palfrey opened her handbag and carefully picked out coins. Everything she did was unhurried, almost authoritative.

(i) luggage

(ii) battled

(iii) authoritative

Question 2c

Marks: 3

(c) Use one example from the text below to explain how the writer suggests Mrs Palfrey’s initial thoughts and feelings about her new circumstances.

Use your own words in your explanation.

When the porter had put down her suitcases and gone, she thought that prisoners must feel as she did now, the first time they are left in their cell, first turning to the window, then facing about to stare at the closed door: after that, counting the paces from wall to wall. She envisaged this briskly.

Question 2d

Marks: 15

(d) Re-read paragraphs 10 and 12.

  • Paragraph 10 begins ‘From the window she could see …’ and gives a description of the view from Mrs Palfrey’s window.
  • Paragraph 12 begins ‘The bed looked rather high …’ and gives a description of the hotel room.

Explain how the writer uses language to convey meaning and to create effect in these paragraphs. Choose three examples of words or phrases from each paragraph to support your answer. Your choices should include the use of imagery.

Write about 200 to 300 words.

Up to 15 marks are available for the content of your answer.

Question 3

Marks: 25

Re-read Text C, Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont, in the insert and then answer Question 3 on this question paper.

You are the taxi driver. Your employer asks you to write a report about your journey with Mrs Palfrey to the hotel. You decide to write about:

  • What you saw and felt during your journey to the hotel.
  • What you remember about Mrs Palfrey and her reactions to the hotel.
  • What your reasons were for helping Mrs Palfrey with her luggage and what do you think she thought about your service.

Write the words of your report.

Base your report on what you have read in Text C, but be careful to use your own words.

Address each of the three bullet points.

Begin your journal entry with the first point.

Write about 250 to 350 words.

Up to 15 marks are available for the content of your answer and up to 10 marks for the quality of your writing.

Close

Question 1a

a)

Name two people the writer chatted to on the bench.

  • Ann Davies
  • Helen Brodie MBE

(no marks for Ashley Jones)

You must have 2 correct answers for 1 mark

[1 marks]

Question 1b

b)

Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i) ‘in a bid to tackle loneliness’ ‘An attempt to prevent people from being on their own.

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

(ii) ‘a con artist’: A fraudster/scammer/crook/someone who defrauds a person for money

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

Question 1c

c)

Re-read paragraph 3, (‘The idea is championed by… interaction.’). Give two benefits of the ‘happy to chat’ bench

  • To offer people more human interaction/company
  • To stop people being conned/defrauded because they’re lonely

1 mark for each correct answer (max. 2 marks)

[2 marks]

Question 1d

d)

Re-read paragraphs 5 and 6, (‘I got chatting… just natural.’).

(i) Identify two common conversation starters mentioned by Anne.

  • People intrigued by the bench/asking what it’s about
  • People commenting on the bench being a good idea
  • Asking whether people are on holiday
  • Whether people visit each year

1 mark for each correct answer. 

[2 marks]

(ii) Explain why Anne Davies uses the bench.

  • She lives alone – the bench gives her company
  • She has to do it – she feels compelled to help people
  • She likes to take care of people
  • To tell people about the bench

1 mark for each idea, max. of 3 marks

[3 marks]

Question 1e

e)

Re-read paragraphs 8-10, (‘The pair have used… after all.’). Using your own words, explain why the writer went back to London in high spirits.

  • He can see the benefits of the bench –it allows people to talk to strangers, especially when they’re a mix of interesting people.
  • He sees how much the bench helps older, lonely people be able to speak and be listened to.
  • He finds it encouraging that people still look after each other in the community.
  • He has met people who inspire him.

1 mark for each idea, max. 3 marks. Answers which are entirely in the words of the text get no marks.

[3 marks]

Question 1f

f)

According to Text B, what made the film so emotionally moving and why was it released in time for Christmas?

Example top-grade answer:

The film gives us a snapshot into the private thoughts and feelings of someone who is alone; in this case, a widowed elderly woman celebrating what would have been her 50th wedding anniversary. It is a very poignant film, made sadder by the fact the woman speaks only four words in order for the audience to understand the feeling of despair people like her feel. The film reminds people that lonely people have a history and that their loneliness isn’t out of choice but circumstances, especially death of loved ones. It was deliberately released at Christmas, at a time which would most resonate with people, to encourage people to donate money, which the charity needs.    

Reading marks:

9-10 marks:

  • very effective answer that demonstrates a thorough understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a wide range of relevant ideas and is consistently well-focused.
  • Points are skilfully selected to demonstrate an overview.

7-8 marks:

  • An effective answer that demonstrates a competent understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a good range of relevant ideas and is mostly focused.
  • Points are carefully selected and there is some evidence of an overview.

5-6 marks:

  • partially effective response that demonstrates a reasonable understanding of the requirements of the task.
  • Demonstrates understanding of ideas with occasional loss of focus.
  • Some evidence of selection of relevant ideas but may include excess material.

Writing marks:

4-5 marks:

  • A relevant response that is expressed clearly, fluently and mostly with concision.
  • The response is well organised.
  • The response is in your own words (where appropriate), using a range of well-chosen vocabulary.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar are mostly accurate.

2-3 marks:

  • A relevant response that is generally expressed clearly, with some evidence of concision.
  • There may be some lapses in organisation.
  • The response is mainly expressed in your own words (where appropriate) but there may be reliance on the words of the text.
  • Errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[15 marks]

Question 2a

a)

Identify a word or phrase from the text which suggests the same idea as the words underlined:

(i) drove down the wet, quiet road = her taxi sloshed along the almost deserted Cromwell Road. [1 marks]

(ii) dismiss the fear = banish terror. [1 marks]

(iii) appearing quite similar = looking much the same[1 marks]

(iv) food = cuisine. [1 marks]

Question 2b

b)

Using your own words, explain what the writer means by each of the words underlined:

(i) luggage = suitcases/baggage/cases/bags filled with her belongings   [1 marks]

(ii) battled = fought/contended/wrestled/struggled [1 marks]

(iii) authoritative = powerful/domineering/commanding/assertive/confident/self-assured [1 marks]

Question 2c

c)

Use one example from the text below to explain how the writer suggests Mrs Palfrey’s initial thoughts and feelings about her new circumstances.

Answers might include:

  • prisoners must feel = she feels trapped or as if she no longer has control of her freedom.
  • the first time they are left in their cell = that she compares her room to a prison cell, that she’s disappointed with it because it’s smaller and/or less comfortable than she hoped. ‘Left’ also suggests she feels abandoned and lonely.
  • First turning to the window…closed door = she feels trapped or claustrophobic or oppressed by the room. The image shows her desperation as she turns to each exit, as if she’s looking for ways to escape.
  • Stare at the closed door = coming to terms with the bleakness of her new situation; starring at the door indicates that it is dawning on her that she no longer has her freedom; she is not moving out of fear or shock.
  • Counting the paces from wall to wall = assessing how small her new room is; mirrors the behaviour of a trapped animal to convey her sense of oppression.

3 marks for an appropriate example followed by a detailed and convincing explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings

2 marks for an appropriate example followed by a basic explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings

1 mark for an example followed by a partial explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings.

[3 marks]

Question 2d

d)

Explain how the writer uses language to convey meaning and to create effect in these paragraphs. Choose three examples of words or phrases from each paragraph to support your answer. Your choices should include the use of imagery.

Example top-grade answer (Paragraph 10):

The writer repeats “could see only” to emphasise how limited the view was from Mrs Palfrey’s window. The addition of ‘only’ conveys literally how empty the view from her window is, but also suggests how empty her future outlook appears to be from her perspective at the time. The description of the view as “a white brick wall down which dirty rain slithered” contrasts a once-attractive and well-kept wall which has now been spoilt with age and neglect. The image alludes to how Mrs Palfrey may feel about herself in this context. The word ‘slithered’ also has sinister biblical connotations of a snake, perhaps indicating her imminent downfall, or perceived fall from grace. Mrs Palfrey “tried to see [the fire escape] was graceful”, showing her determination to be optimistic, despite her grim circumstances. The fire escape may also allude to death, perhaps her own, which the writer uses as a metaphor for her willingness to reconcile and be at peace with.

Example top-grade answer (Paragraph 12):

The room itself acts as a metaphor for Mrs Palfrey; it is old and slightly worn out but seems warm and dignified with a few quirks. She remarks the carpet looked “worn, but not threadbare” to show her ability to be optimistic and look on the bright side. However it could also represent her own stage of life; old but still with some life in yet. The small details of beauty in the room, such as the “peacock-blue tiles” – and the fact Mrs Palfrey feels it is significant enough to notice and comment on – suggests that Mrs Palfrey is sensitive and has a faded beauty, just like the room. The radiator is described as giving off a “dry, scorched smell and subdued noises”. The unpleasant image helps us understand the smells and sounds of the room, and the radiator represents Mrs Palfrey herself; that she may radiate an abrasiveness or bitterness, but she has a warmth to her which the reader finds endearing. The ‘subdued noises’ may indicate that people do not listen to her, or take her seriously, which encourages the reader to feel sympathy for her.

13-15 marks:

  • Wide-ranging discussion of judiciously selected language with some high quality comments that add meaning and associations to words/phrases in both parts of the text, and demonstrate the writer’s reasons for using them.
  • Tackles imagery with some precision and imagination.
  • There is clear evidence that the candidate understands how language works.

10-12 marks:

  • Explanations are given of carefully selected words and phrases.
  • Explanations of meanings within the context of the text are secure and effects are identified in both parts of the text.
  • Images are recognised as such and the response goes some way to explaining them.
  • There is some evidence that the candidate understands how language works.

7-9 marks:

  • A satisfactory attempt is made to select appropriate words and phrases.
  • The response mostly gives meanings of words and any attempt to suggest and explain effects is basic or very general.
  • One half of the text may be better addressed than the other.

[15 marks]

Question 3

Example top-grade answer:

Sunday 11th January – Report for the day

I collected the passenger, a Mrs Palfrey, from the train station and drove her to the Claremont Hotel on Cromwell Road, as instructed. We arrived in the afternoon. It had been raining so although the roads were quiet, with it being Sunday, I drove slowly because the roads the wet. I knew the location of Cromwell Road but I was unfamiliar with the hotel itself. As I approached nearer the hotel, I slowed down considerably as not to miss it; the buildings all look the same so I had to reach my head out the window (the windscreen was too fogged up) to read the signs on each building. This obviously made the passenger slightly nervous as she leaned forward in the cab and also began to look for the hotel. Her body language looked agitated; I assumed she was concerned about which building was the correct one. I was unable to reassure her about the hotel, which I felt may have added to her agitation.

The passenger herself was a tall, elderly lady; she had some difficulty exiting the taxi and used a walking stick so I assumed her to have a disability or some difficulty in moving. I noticed she had varicose veins on her legs which may have been the cause. Once we eventually located the correct building I noticed her demeanour change and she became more relaxed; I assumed she was relieved that the building looked pleasant and well-kept.

Because the passenger had obvious mobility difficulties, I helped carry her many suitcases into the hotel; she looked physically unable to do so herself. I would normally wait for hotel staff to help – I don’t particularly like going into such places – but there was no one to be seen. The revolving doors caused some difficulty, especially as I could hardly see above the cases I was carrying, but I’m pleased to report no injury was caused. The passenger seemed satisfied with my service and particularly grateful that I helped with her bags as she kindly gave me a small cash tip once inside the hotel.

I left the passenger in the reception area, with the porter and receptionist, drove off immediately afterwards to my next job.

Reading marks:

13-15:

  • The response reveals a thorough evaluation and analysis of the text.
  • Developed ideas are sustained and well related to the text.
  • A wide range of ideas is applied.
  • There is supporting detail throughout, which is well integrated into the response, contributing to a strong sense of purpose and approach.
  • All three bullets are well covered.
  • A consistent and convincing voice is used.

10-12

  • The response demonstrates a competent reading of the text with some evidence of basic evaluation or analysis.
  • A good range of ideas is evident.
  • Some ideas are developed but the ability to sustain them may not be consistent.
  • There is frequent, helpful supporting detail, contributing to a clear sense of purpose.
  • All three bullets are covered.
  • An appropriate voice is used.

7-9:

  • The text has been read reasonably well.
  • A range of straightforward ideas is offered.
  • Opportunities for development are rarely taken.
  • Supporting detail is present but there may be some mechanical use of the text.
  • There is uneven focus on the bullets.
  • The voice is plain.

Writing/Structure/Order marks:

9-10:

  • Effective register for audience and purpose.
  • The language of the response sounds convincing and consistently appropriate.
  • Ideas are firmly expressed in a wide range of effective and/or interesting language.
  • Structure and sequence are sound throughout.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar almost always accurate.

7-8:

  • Some awareness of an appropriate register for audience and purpose.
  • Language is mostly fluent and there is clarity of expression.
  • There is a sufficient range of vocabulary to express ideas with subtlety and precision.
  • The response is mainly well structured and well sequenced.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar generally accurate.

5-6 marks:

  • Language is clear but comparatively plain and/or factual, expressing little opinion.
  • Ideas are rarely extended, but explanations are adequate.
  • Some sections are quite well sequenced but there may be flaws in structure.
  • Minor, but more frequent, errors of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[25 marks]

Close

Loading Revision Notes...

Close

Join Save My Exams

Get full access to all resources:

  • Exam questions organised by topic
  • Model answers
  • Downloadable question PDFs
  • Progress tracking
Join Now
Already a member?
Go to Top