CIE IGCSE English Language

Practice Papers

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Practice Paper 1B

Question 1a

Marks: 1

Read Text AMining is riven with violence and business is complicit, and then answer Questions 1(a)–(e) on this question paper.

(a)  Name two minerals the independent miners are searching for

 

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a)

Name two minerals the independent miners are searching for:

  • Diamonds
  • Gold

You must have 2 correct answers for 1 mark

[1 marks]

Question 1b

Marks: 4

(b)  Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i)  ‘is not issued by any government’

(ii)  ‘primary beneficiaries.’

Close

b)

Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i) ‘is not issued by any government’: It is unofficial, perhaps illegal and nothing to do with the state

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

(ii) primary beneficiaries‘: The people who benefit the most.

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

Question 1c

Marks: 2

(c)  Re-read paragraph 3, (‘Ore becomes metal.. pounds..’)

Give two reasons why the minerals are mined by the groups.

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c)

Re-read paragraph 3, (‘Ore becomes metal.. pounds.’). Give two reasons why the minerals are mined by the groups.

  • The mineral trade is worth billions
  • The metals are needed for every-day products

1 mark for each correct answer (max. 2 marks)

[2 marks]

Question 1d

Marks: 5

(d)  Re-read paragraph 4, (‘If you have ever wondered… protection.’).

(i)  Identify two things the armed groups spend money on.

(ii)  Explain how the armed groups make their money.

Close

d)

Re-read paragraph 4, (‘If you have ever wondered… protection.’).

(i) Identify two things the armed groups spend money on.

  • Paying their fighters
  • Equipping their fighters/Equipment for fighting

1 mark for each correct answer. No mark for ‘footprint’ (not an item)

[2 marks]

(ii) Explain how the armed groups make their money.

  • Some seize and run mines
  • Many extort/bribe miners
  • Illegally tax miners
  • Toll transportation routes

1 mark for each idea, max. of 3 marks

[3 marks]

Question 1e

Marks: 3

(e)  Re-read paragraph 7, (‘This illicit trade… still prevails.’).

Using your own words, explain why violent mining groups can continue with their illegal methods and practices

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e)

Re-read paragraph 7, (‘This illicit trade… still prevails.’). Using your own words, explain why violent mining groups can continue with their illegal methods and practices

  • The market is willing to ignore their practices/illegal methods
  • The market is covert
  • The market isn’t well regulated
  • The illegally-mined metals are mixed with legal metals
  • The industry is corrupt
  • Many in the industry choose to be ignorant

1 mark for each idea, max. 3 marks. Answers which are entirely in the words of the text get no marks.

[3 marks]

Question 1f

Marks: 15

Read Text B,“Blood Diamond” Review: Wishing things were otherwise, in the insert and then answer Question 1(f) on this question paper.

 (f) According to Text B, what made the movie so enjoyable and what real-life social problems does it present?

You must use continuous writing (not note form) and use your own words as far as possible.

Your summary should not be more than 120 words.

Up to 10 marks are available for the content of your answer and up to 5 marks for the quality of your writing.

Close

f)

According to Text B, what made the movie so enjoyable and what real-life social problems does it present?

What made the movie so enjoyable:

  • It’s an emotional film /emotionally stirring
  • It’s a story about romantic adventure
  • It’s exciting
  • It’s exceptionally well made
  • There’s a lot of action
  • It’s visually enjoyable/the aesthetic is enjoyable
  • The handheld camera techniques make it more visually enjoyable/immersive
  • The filmmakers let the audience draw their own conclusions/it’s a pedagogical film
  • The film is educational/educates the audience about African issues
  • It’s the director’s best movie
  • There’s a personal story (about Solomon, a fisherman)
  • There are celebrities in the film/celebrity actors make it a more glamorous film

What real-life social problems does it present?

  • Civil wars
  • Racial conflict
  • Western exploitation and interference
  • The ‘blood diamond’ trade/ diamond smuggling
  • The impact on families and communities from the diamond trade/guarilla armies
  • The complex politics and culture of African countries
  • Violence surrounding the metal industry
  • The neo-colonialist issues surrounding Africa’s natural resources

Example top-grade answer:

The movie was enjoyable because it focused on more than just the politics; there was also an adventure film with a love story. The movie also made the issues personal by focusing on a fisherman and his family and how they were impacted. The director and producers also made the movie enjoyable by including glamour and not preaching to the audience about the real-life social problems it presented, particularly how white Europeans have plundered Africa and how ordinary Africans have suffered as a result. The film also exposes the chaos of African war zones and how young people are caught up in the killing.

Reading marks:

9-10 marks:

  • very effective answer that demonstrates a thorough understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a wide range of relevant ideas and is consistently well-focused.
  • Points are skillfully  selected to demonstrate an overview.

7-8 marks:

  • An effective answer that demonstrates a competent understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a good range of relevant ideas and is mostly focused.
  • Points are carefully selected and there is some evidence of an overview.

5-6 marks:

  • partially effective response that demonstrates a reasonable understanding of the requirements of the task.
  • Demonstrates understanding of ideas with occasional loss of focus.
  • Some evidence of selection of relevant ideas but may include excess material.

Writing marks:

4-5 marks:

  • A relevant response that is expressed clearly, fluently and mostly with concision.
  • The response is well organised.
  • The response is in your own words (where appropriate), using a range of well-chosen vocabulary.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar are mostly accurate.

2-3 marks:

  • A relevant response that is generally expressed clearly, with some evidence of concision.
  • There may be some lapses in organisation.
  • The response is mainly expressed in your own words (where appropriate) but there may be reliance on the words of the text.
  • Errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[15 marks]

Question 2a

Marks: 4

Read Text C, The Duchess and the Jeweller, in the insert and then answer Questions 2(a)–(d) on this question paper.

 (a) Identify a word or phrase from the text which suggests the same idea as the words underlined:

(i) Oliver walked into the room silently.

(ii) The two young men were jealous of him.

(iii) The telephone rang obediently.

(iv) He heard quiet footsteps coming near.

Question 2b

Marks: 3

(b) Using your own words, explain what the writer means by each of the words underlined:

Then he touched a spring in the wall and slowly the panelling slid open, and behind it were the steel safes, five, no, six of them, all of burnished steel. He twisted a key; unlocked one; then another. Each was lined with a pad of deep crimson velvet; in each lay jewels— bracelets, necklaces, rings, tiaras, ducal coronets; loose stones in glass shells; rubies, emeralds, pearls, diamonds.

(i) panelling

(ii) twisted

(iii) lined

Question 2c

Marks: 3

(c) Use one example from the text below to explain how the writer suggests Oliver Bacon’s thoughts and feelings about his jewellery.

Use your own words in your explanation.

Then he touched a spring in the wall and slowly the panelling slid open, and behind it were the steel safes, five, no, six of them, all of burnished steel. He twisted a key; unlocked one; then another. Each was lined with a pad of deep crimson velvet; in each lay jewels— bracelets, necklaces, rings, tiaras, ducal coronets; loose stones in glass shells; rubies, emeralds, pearls, diamonds.

Question 2d

Marks: 15

(d) Re-read paragraphs 6 and 8.

  • Paragraph 6 begins ‘”In ten minutes,” he said …’ and is about Oliver Bacon thinking about his childhood.
  • Paragraph 8 begins ‘And Oliver, rising, could hear …’ and gives Oliver Bacon’s impression of The Duchess as she enters his room.

Explain how the writer uses language to convey meaning and to create effect in these paragraphs. Choose three examples of words or phrases from each paragraph to support your answer. Your choices should include the use of imagery.

Write about 200 to 300 words.

Up to 15 marks are available for the content of your answer.

Question 3

Marks: 25

Re-read Text CThe Duchess and the Jeweller, in the insert and then answer Question 3 on this question paper.

You are Wicks, one of the young men who works in Oliver Bacon’s jewellery shop. That evening, you go home and write a letter to your mother about your day in the shop. You decide to write about:

  • What you saw and felt during your shift in the shop that day
  • What you remember about The Duchess and how you reacted to her entering the shop
  • What your reasons were for not speaking to your boss, Oliver Bacon, that morning when he entered the shop.

Write the words of the letter.

Base your letter on what you have read in Text C, but be careful to use your own words.

Address each of the three bullet points.

Begin your journal entry with the first point.

Write about 250 to 350 words.

Up to 15 marks are available for the content of your answer and up to 10 marks for the quality of your writing.

Close

Question 1a

a)

Name two minerals the independent miners are searching for:

  • Diamonds
  • Gold

You must have 2 correct answers for 1 mark

[1 marks]

Question 1b

b)

Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i) ‘is not issued by any government’: It is unofficial, perhaps illegal and nothing to do with the state

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

(ii) primary beneficiaries‘: The people who benefit the most.

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

Question 1c

c)

Re-read paragraph 3, (‘Ore becomes metal.. pounds.’). Give two reasons why the minerals are mined by the groups.

  • The mineral trade is worth billions
  • The metals are needed for every-day products

1 mark for each correct answer (max. 2 marks)

[2 marks]

Question 1d

d)

Re-read paragraph 4, (‘If you have ever wondered… protection.’).

(i) Identify two things the armed groups spend money on.

  • Paying their fighters
  • Equipping their fighters/Equipment for fighting

1 mark for each correct answer. No mark for ‘footprint’ (not an item)

[2 marks]

(ii) Explain how the armed groups make their money.

  • Some seize and run mines
  • Many extort/bribe miners
  • Illegally tax miners
  • Toll transportation routes

1 mark for each idea, max. of 3 marks

[3 marks]

Question 1e

e)

Re-read paragraph 7, (‘This illicit trade… still prevails.’). Using your own words, explain why violent mining groups can continue with their illegal methods and practices

  • The market is willing to ignore their practices/illegal methods
  • The market is covert
  • The market isn’t well regulated
  • The illegally-mined metals are mixed with legal metals
  • The industry is corrupt
  • Many in the industry choose to be ignorant

1 mark for each idea, max. 3 marks. Answers which are entirely in the words of the text get no marks.

[3 marks]

Question 1f

f)

According to Text B, what made the movie so enjoyable and what real-life social problems does it present?

What made the movie so enjoyable:

  • It’s an emotional film /emotionally stirring
  • It’s a story about romantic adventure
  • It’s exciting
  • It’s exceptionally well made
  • There’s a lot of action
  • It’s visually enjoyable/the aesthetic is enjoyable
  • The handheld camera techniques make it more visually enjoyable/immersive
  • The filmmakers let the audience draw their own conclusions/it’s a pedagogical film
  • The film is educational/educates the audience about African issues
  • It’s the director’s best movie
  • There’s a personal story (about Solomon, a fisherman)
  • There are celebrities in the film/celebrity actors make it a more glamorous film

What real-life social problems does it present?

  • Civil wars
  • Racial conflict
  • Western exploitation and interference
  • The ‘blood diamond’ trade/ diamond smuggling
  • The impact on families and communities from the diamond trade/guarilla armies
  • The complex politics and culture of African countries
  • Violence surrounding the metal industry
  • The neo-colonialist issues surrounding Africa’s natural resources

Example top-grade answer:

The movie was enjoyable because it focused on more than just the politics; there was also an adventure film with a love story. The movie also made the issues personal by focusing on a fisherman and his family and how they were impacted. The director and producers also made the movie enjoyable by including glamour and not preaching to the audience about the real-life social problems it presented, particularly how white Europeans have plundered Africa and how ordinary Africans have suffered as a result. The film also exposes the chaos of African war zones and how young people are caught up in the killing.

Reading marks:

9-10 marks:

  • very effective answer that demonstrates a thorough understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a wide range of relevant ideas and is consistently well-focused.
  • Points are skillfully  selected to demonstrate an overview.

7-8 marks:

  • An effective answer that demonstrates a competent understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a good range of relevant ideas and is mostly focused.
  • Points are carefully selected and there is some evidence of an overview.

5-6 marks:

  • partially effective response that demonstrates a reasonable understanding of the requirements of the task.
  • Demonstrates understanding of ideas with occasional loss of focus.
  • Some evidence of selection of relevant ideas but may include excess material.

Writing marks:

4-5 marks:

  • A relevant response that is expressed clearly, fluently and mostly with concision.
  • The response is well organised.
  • The response is in your own words (where appropriate), using a range of well-chosen vocabulary.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar are mostly accurate.

2-3 marks:

  • A relevant response that is generally expressed clearly, with some evidence of concision.
  • There may be some lapses in organisation.
  • The response is mainly expressed in your own words (where appropriate) but there may be reliance on the words of the text.
  • Errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[15 marks]

Question 2a

a)

Identify a word or phrase from the text which suggests the same idea as the words underlined:

(i) walked into the room silently = Strode through the shop without speaking. [1 marks]

(ii) jealous of him = Envying him. [1 marks]

(iii) rang obediently  = buzzed obsequiously[1 marks]

(iv) quiet footsteps coming near = soft slow footsteps approaching. [1 marks]

Question 2b

b)

Using your own words, explain what the writer means by each of the words underlined:

(i) panelling = wooden panels on the wall/frontage/facade [1 marks]

(ii) twisted = Turned [1 marks]

(iii) lined = a protective/soft layer [1 marks]

Question 2c

c)

Use one example from the text extract to explain how the writer suggests Oliver Bacon’s thoughts and feelings about his jewellery.

Answers might include:

  • “he touched a spring” – the gentleness of his action suggests how careful he is with the jewels and how precious they are to him.
  • “slowly the panelling slid open” – the adverb slowly suggests there is a sense of ceremony and performance when he opens the safe, emphasising his respect and awe for the jewels. The image also suggests a majesty to the jewels, whereby their greatness needs to be slowly revealed.
  • “steel safes” – describes how securely Oliver keeps the jewels, suggesting they are very valuable and precious to him.
  • “five, no, six of them” – the way the narrator loses count of how many safes there are shows Oliver’s determination to keep the jewels secure and to himself, perhaps to an obsessional degree.
  • “pad of deep crimson velvet” – the rich colour images creates a sense of luxury and emphasises Oliver’s materialistic enjoyment of his jewels.
  • “He twisted a key” – the verb has slightly sinister connotations, implying Oliver has villainous motivations. The action is slower than simply turning, suggesting a ceremonial performance to opening the safe, emphasising his obsession for the jewels.
  • “He twisted a key; unlocked one; then another.” – the repeated semicolons disrupt the flow of the narrative and make it more staggered, to represent the different layers of safes as Oliver unlocks then. The short sentences create a sense of excitement for the reader, which mimics Oliver’s excitement as he gets closer to his beloved jewels.
  • “bracelets, necklaces, rings, tiaras, ducal coronets; loose stones in glass shells; rubies, emeralds, pearls, diamonds.” – the long list describes his vast collection of different jewels and indicates his passion for them all individually. The mix of sounds and the variety of nouns suggests that Oliver is fascinated or obsessed with the details and intricacies of the jewels.

3 marks for an appropriate example followed by a detailed and convincing explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings

2 marks for an appropriate example followed by a basic explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings

1 mark for an example followed by a partial explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings.

[3 marks]

Question 2d

d)

Explain how the writer uses language to convey meaning and to create effect in these paragraphs. Choose three examples of words or phrases from each paragraph to support your answer. Your choices should include the use of imagery.

Oliver Bacon thinking about his childhood in paragraph 6, beginning ‘”In ten minutes,” he said …’

Example top-grade answer:

Oliver Bacon’s flashback to his childhood portrays his younger self in terms reminiscent of a Victorian vagabond or Dickensian orphan; this is incongruous to the context of the luxurious surroundings of his office. The strict command “Not before” Oliver gives for the Duchess to wait indicates his power and authority to keep someone important waiting; his lack of pleasantries shows he is accustomed to giving regular commands and the sharpness of his demand suggests he doesn’t treat people he perceives to be ‘lower’ than him with much respect. The roman emperors…graved on his sleeve links” imply that Oliver is metaphorically ‘dripping’ in wealth as we’re given an image of presumably expensive cuff-links hanging from his wrists; the verb ‘graved’ suggests that Oliver has figuratively etched sign of authority and wealth onto himself to physically signify his high status to those around him, which is further emphasised by the image of the emperors to show that he is associated with greatness.  The image of the younger Oliver as a “little boy playing marbles” shows a more innocent, care-free side to his character; his game of marbles foreshadows his later obsession with stones and jewels, but also helps to explain it as the game suggests it was his way of isolating himself away from the dangers of streets around him, and the loneliness of his childhood which shows the reader a much more vulnerable side to an otherwise unlikeable character.

Oliver Bacon’s impression of The Duchess as she enters his room in paragraph 8, beginning ‘And Oliver, rising, could hear …’

Example top-grade answer:

The wealthy and flamboyant Duchess is portrayed as competitive and slightly ludicrous yet someone who commands respect and admiration. The slightly ridiculous and undignified way the Duchess “sat down, spreading and splashing” creates a very comic image of her forcefully filling the room as if she’s a giant wave of water. The image also alludes to her being some type of powerful sea creature or goddess such as Amphitrite, which suggests and ridicules her sense of over-entitlement by exaggerating her status. The very short and blunt description of her being “very large, very fat, tightly gurt” juxtaposes against the long and delicate and ornate descriptions of her clothes. This suggests that the ‘real’ person underneath her elaborate exterior is much more ugly; the harsh, monosyllabic language used to describe her body is far less beautiful than the language used to describe her clothes, which emphasises how the ‘real’ person underneath is far less attractive. The animalistic comparison of the Duchess to a “peacock with many feathers” suggests the two characters are in competition, like two wild birds competing for authority.

13-15 marks:

  • Wide-ranging discussion of judiciously selected language with some high quality comments that add meaning and associations to words/phrases in both parts of the text, and demonstrate the writer’s reasons for using them.
  • Tackles imagery with some precision and imagination.
  • There is clear evidence that the candidate understands how language works.

10-12 marks:

  • Explanations are given of carefully selected words and phrases.
  • Explanations of meanings within the context of the text are secure and effects are identified in both parts of the text.
  • Images are recognised as such and the response goes some way to explaining them.
  • There is some evidence that the candidate understands how language works.

7-9 marks:

  • A satisfactory attempt is made to select appropriate words and phrases.
  • The response mostly gives meanings of words and any attempt to suggest and explain effects is basic or very general.
  • One half of the text may be better addressed than the other.

[15 marks]

Question 3

Example top-grade answer:

Dear mother,

I hope your leg is on the mend. I’ve just returned home from a long day in the shop. We had another VIP come in today…or rather a VVIP! The Duchess of Lambourne came to sell Mr Bacon some of her jewellery – I remember thinking as she walked in, she has plenty of it to spare. She was positively dripping in jewels!

I think Mr Bacon knew she was due to come in. He arrived late – as always – and barely acknowledged us. He looked like he was in his own world. Did you know he just wags his glove as a way to say hello?! I remember thinking at the time that if ever I become wealthy one day, I’d at least say hello to the people who work hard for me. I said ‘good morning’ to him once and soon got a telling off by Marshall to never speak to Mr Bacon in the morning. The rule in the shop is never to speak to Mr Bacon unless spoken to, and even that’s wrong sometimes!

And you’ll never guess what Mr Bacon did when the Duchess arrived; he made her wait for him, a full 10 minutes! Poor Spencer had to make up an excuse, and we all just stood there rather awkwardly while the Duchess sat on a chair by the counter. I felt quite sorry for her in a way, she looked slightly embarrassed. She looked iridescent as she entered the shop; I’ve never seen so many colours and jewels on one person. She looked like a walking portrait. I remember working out how much her outfit must have been worth; I estimated several thousand pounds. It looked like quite an effort to wear, too – all those layers and jewles must be quite heavy! I remember thinking she didn’t look like an especially happy person, which is rather sad.

We have the American Ambassador coming in tomorrow. It’s all top-secret of course, but I trust you won’t tell anyone. I’ll write tomorrow and let you know what he’s like.

Much love,
Wicks x

Reading marks:

13-15:

  • The response reveals a thorough evaluation and analysis of the text.
  • Developed ideas are sustained and well related to the text.
  • A wide range of ideas is applied.
  • There is supporting detail throughout, which is well integrated into the response, contributing to a strong sense of purpose and approach.
  • All three bullets are well covered.
  • A consistent and convincing voice is used.

10-12

  • The response demonstrates a competent reading of the text with some evidence of basic evaluation or analysis.
  • A good range of ideas is evident.
  • Some ideas are developed but the ability to sustain them may not be consistent.
  • There is frequent, helpful supporting detail, contributing to a clear sense of purpose.
  • All three bullets are covered.
  • An appropriate voice is used.

7-9:

  • The text has been read reasonably well.
  • A range of straightforward ideas is offered.
  • Opportunities for development are rarely taken.
  • Supporting detail is present but there may be some mechanical use of the text.
  • There is uneven focus on the bullets.
  • The voice is plain.

Writing/Structure/Order marks:

9-10:

  • Effective register for audience and purpose.
  • The language of the response sounds convincing and consistently appropriate.
  • Ideas are firmly expressed in a wide range of effective and/or interesting language.
  • Structure and sequence are sound throughout.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar almost always accurate.

7-8:

  • Some awareness of an appropriate register for audience and purpose.
  • Language is mostly fluent and there is clarity of expression.
  • There is a sufficient range of vocabulary to express ideas with subtlety and precision.
  • The response is mainly well structured and well sequenced.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar generally accurate.

5-6 marks:

  • Language is clear but comparatively plain and/or factual, expressing little opinion.
  • Ideas are rarely extended, but explanations are adequate.
  • Some sections are quite well sequenced but there may be flaws in structure.
  • Minor, but more frequent, errors of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[25 marks]

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