CIE IGCSE English Language

Practice Papers

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Practice Paper 1D

Question 1a

Marks: 1

Read Text AThousands of artefacts are discovered at a 12,500-year-old Native American site in Connecticut, in the insert and then answer Questions 1(a)–(e) on this question paper.

 (a)  Name two things found by the archaeologists at the site.

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a)

Name two things found by the archaeologists at the site.

  • Open fire pit
  • Posts from temporary housing
  • Primeval tools

You must have 2 correct answers for 1 mark

[1 marks]

Question 1b

Marks: 4

(b)  Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i)  ‘once-in-a-lifetime opportunity’ (line 5):

(ii)  ‘understand the first peopleing’.’ (line 6):

Close

b)

Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i) ‘once-in-a-lifetime opportunity’: A unique chance in the course of someone’s life / a change that will never be repeated in one’s life

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

(ii) understand the first peopleing’‘: Comprehend how the area became populated/inhabited/occupied

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

Question 1c

Marks: 2

(c)  Re-read paragraph 5, (‘the artefacts discovered… large prey.’)

Give two conclusions of the study that the artefacts confirmed.

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c)

Re-read paragraph 5, (‘the artefacts discovered… large prey.’). Give two conclusions of the study that the artefacts confirmed.

  • North American hunters used spear-throwers
  • They hurled their weapons over longer distances
  • Their weapons could bring down large prey

1 mark for each correct answer (max. 2 marks)

[2 marks]

Question 1d

Marks: 5

(d)  Re-read paragraphs 6 and 7, (‘Anthropologists have studied… like a javelin.’)

(i)  Identify two features contained in the stone spear points that were studied.

(ii)  Explain how the weapon works.

Close

d)

Re-read paragraphs 6 and 7 (‘Anthropologists have studied… like a javelin.’).

(i) Identify two features contained in the stone spear points that were studied.

  • Fractures / Tiny fractures
  • Chips / Distinctive chips

1 mark for each correct answer. No mark for ‘end of the spear or dart’ 

[2 marks]

(ii) Explain how the weapon worked.

  • The spear points are attached to the end of the spear or dart
  • The fractures and chips act as levers
  • The levers allow it to be thrown fast and far

1 mark for each idea, max. of 3 marks

[3 marks]

Question 1e

Marks: 3

(e)  Re-read paragraphs 8 and 9, (‘The new study suggests… range of landscapes’).

Using your own words, explain what the study suggests about the spear points.

Close

e)

Re-read paragraphs 8 and 9 (‘‘The new study suggests… range of landscapes’). Using your own words, explain what the study suggests about the spear points.

  • These advanced tools were brought by some of the first people to populate North America.
  • They could hunt large animals.
  • They probably would not have been able to hunt large animals without the technology.
  • The technology helped these people to skillfully advance across North America.
  • The weapons helped them live in different types of territory/land.

1 mark for each idea, max. 3 marks. Answers which are entirely in the words of the text get no marks.

[3 marks]

Question 1f

Marks: 15

Read Text B‘It’s long overdue’: the first exhibition for Native American female artists, in the insert and then answer Question 1(f) on this question paper.

 (f) According to Text B, what does the artwork offer and what did the curators hope to achieve by devoting the exhibition to Native women artists?

You must use continuous writing (not note form) and use your own words as far as possible.

Your summary should not be more than 120 words.

Up to 10 marks are available for the content of your answer and up to 5 marks for the quality of your writing.

Close

f)

According to Text B, what does the artwork offer and what did the curators hope to achieve by devoting the exhibition to Native women artists? You must use continuous writing (not note form) and use your own words as far as possible.

What the artwork offers:

  • The names of Native artists
  • Recognition of the artists
  • To show the legacy, relationships and power of Native women
  • To show how the work is connected to our history
  • To counteract/refute stereotypes of Native art as unsophisticated or living in the past
  • To offer an ignored/oppressed narrative/story
  • To show the strength of Native people
  • To show the effects of colonialism from their perspective
  • To draw attention to the violence against First Nations women

What the curators hoped to achieve:

  • To honour Native women / Native women artists
  • To dedicate a show to Native women throughout history to the present day
  • To identify / individualise Native people
  • To respond to 19th century men / male view of Native art
  • To recognise that 90% of Native art is done by women
  • To offer a message of healing
  • To be counter-narrative/to correct the history of art/ to modernise art history
  • To bring Native art into the mainstream

Reading marks:

9-10 marks:

  • very effective answer that demonstrates a thorough understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a wide range of relevant ideas and is consistently well-focused.
  • Points are skillfully selected to demonstrate an overview.

7-8 marks:

  • An effective answer that demonstrates a competent understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a good range of relevant ideas and is mostly focused.
  • Points are carefully selected and there is some evidence of an overview.

5-6 marks:

  • partially effective response that demonstrates a reasonable understanding of the requirements of the task.
  • Demonstrates understanding of ideas with occasional loss of focus.
  • Some evidence of selection of relevant ideas but may include excess material.

Writing marks:

4-5 marks:

  • A relevant response that is expressed clearly, fluently and mostly with concision.
  • The response is well organised.
  • The response is in your own words (where appropriate), using a range of well-chosen vocabulary.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar are mostly accurate.

2-3 marks:

  • A relevant response that is generally expressed clearly, with some evidence of concision.
  • There may be some lapses in organisation.
  • The response is mainly expressed in your own words (where appropriate) but there may be reliance on the words of the text.
  • Errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[15 marks]

Question 2a

Marks: 4

Read Text CTwo Old Women, in the insert and then answer Questions 2(a)–(d) on this question paper.

(a) Identify a word or phrase from the text which suggests the same idea as the words underlined:

(i) Sa’s mother was concentrating on the night sky to distract herself.

(ii) Younger women dragged Ch’idzigyaak and Sa’s belongings.

(iii) The women’s agreement was successful.

(iv) The two old women both had personality faults.

Question 2b

Marks: 3

(b) Using your own words, explain what the writer means by each of the words underlined:

On that day, something more than the cold hung in the air as The People gathered around their few flickering fires and listened to the chief. He was a man who stood almost a head taller than the other men. From within the folds of his parka ruff he spoke about the cold, hard days they were to expect and of what each would have to contribute if they were to survive the winter.

(i) gathered

(ii) flickering

(iii) contribute

Question 2c

Marks: 3

(c) Use one example from the text below to explain how the writer suggests the chief’s thoughts and feelings at the time of the announcement.

Use your own words in your explanation.

Then, in a loud, clear voice he made a sudden announcement: ”The council and I have arrived at a decision.” The chief paused as if to find the strength to voice his next words. ”We are going to have to leave the old ones behind.”

Question 2d

Marks: 15

(d) Re-read paragraphs 7 and 9.

  • Paragraph 7 begins ‘The starkness of the primitive land …’ and is about how the tribe reacted initially to the announcement.
  • Paragraph 9 begins ‘The chief understood why …’ and gives the chief’s impressions of the tribe’s reaction.

Explain how the writer uses language to convey meaning and to create effect in these paragraphs. Choose three examples of words or phrases from each paragraph to support your answer. Your choices should include the use of imagery.

Write about 200 to 300 words.

Up to 15 marks are available for the content of your answer.

Question 3

Marks: 25

Re-read Text CTwo Old Women, in the insert and then answer Question 3 on this question paper.

You are the chief. Some years later you are interviewed about your memories of that day for a newspaper article about your tribe. The interviewer asks you the following three questions only:

  • What did you see and feel during your announcement to the tribe that day?
  • What do you remember about the tribe’s behaviour and reactions that day?
  • What were your reasons for leaving the two old women that day and what do you think happened to them?

Write the words of the interview. 

Base your interview on what you have read in Text C, but be careful to use your own words.

Address each of the three bullet points.

Begin your interview with the first point.

Write about 250 to 350 words.

Up to 15 marks are available for the content of your answer and up to 10 marks for the quality of your writing.

Close

Question 1a

a)

Name two things found by the archaeologists at the site.

  • Open fire pit
  • Posts from temporary housing
  • Primeval tools

You must have 2 correct answers for 1 mark

[1 marks]

Question 1b

b)

Using your own words, explain what the text means by:

(i) ‘once-in-a-lifetime opportunity’: A unique chance in the course of someone’s life / a change that will never be repeated in one’s life

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

(ii) understand the first peopleing’‘: Comprehend how the area became populated/inhabited/occupied

2 marks for full explanation, 1 mark for partial explanation.

[2 marks]

Question 1c

c)

Re-read paragraph 5, (‘the artefacts discovered… large prey.’). Give two conclusions of the study that the artefacts confirmed.

  • North American hunters used spear-throwers
  • They hurled their weapons over longer distances
  • Their weapons could bring down large prey

1 mark for each correct answer (max. 2 marks)

[2 marks]

Question 1d

d)

Re-read paragraphs 6 and 7 (‘Anthropologists have studied… like a javelin.’).

(i) Identify two features contained in the stone spear points that were studied.

  • Fractures / Tiny fractures
  • Chips / Distinctive chips

1 mark for each correct answer. No mark for ‘end of the spear or dart’ 

[2 marks]

(ii) Explain how the weapon worked.

  • The spear points are attached to the end of the spear or dart
  • The fractures and chips act as levers
  • The levers allow it to be thrown fast and far

1 mark for each idea, max. of 3 marks

[3 marks]

Question 1e

e)

Re-read paragraphs 8 and 9 (‘‘The new study suggests… range of landscapes’). Using your own words, explain what the study suggests about the spear points.

  • These advanced tools were brought by some of the first people to populate North America.
  • They could hunt large animals.
  • They probably would not have been able to hunt large animals without the technology.
  • The technology helped these people to skillfully advance across North America.
  • The weapons helped them live in different types of territory/land.

1 mark for each idea, max. 3 marks. Answers which are entirely in the words of the text get no marks.

[3 marks]

Question 1f

f)

According to Text B, what does the artwork offer and what did the curators hope to achieve by devoting the exhibition to Native women artists? You must use continuous writing (not note form) and use your own words as far as possible.

What the artwork offers:

  • The names of Native artists
  • Recognition of the artists
  • To show the legacy, relationships and power of Native women
  • To show how the work is connected to our history
  • To counteract/refute stereotypes of Native art as unsophisticated or living in the past
  • To offer an ignored/oppressed narrative/story
  • To show the strength of Native people
  • To show the effects of colonialism from their perspective
  • To draw attention to the violence against First Nations women

What the curators hoped to achieve:

  • To honour Native women / Native women artists
  • To dedicate a show to Native women throughout history to the present day
  • To identify / individualise Native people
  • To respond to 19th century men / male view of Native art
  • To recognise that 90% of Native art is done by women
  • To offer a message of healing
  • To be counter-narrative/to correct the history of art/ to modernise art history
  • To bring Native art into the mainstream

Reading marks:

9-10 marks:

  • very effective answer that demonstrates a thorough understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a wide range of relevant ideas and is consistently well-focused.
  • Points are skillfully selected to demonstrate an overview.

7-8 marks:

  • An effective answer that demonstrates a competent understanding
  • Demonstrates understanding of a good range of relevant ideas and is mostly focused.
  • Points are carefully selected and there is some evidence of an overview.

5-6 marks:

  • partially effective response that demonstrates a reasonable understanding of the requirements of the task.
  • Demonstrates understanding of ideas with occasional loss of focus.
  • Some evidence of selection of relevant ideas but may include excess material.

Writing marks:

4-5 marks:

  • A relevant response that is expressed clearly, fluently and mostly with concision.
  • The response is well organised.
  • The response is in your own words (where appropriate), using a range of well-chosen vocabulary.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar are mostly accurate.

2-3 marks:

  • A relevant response that is generally expressed clearly, with some evidence of concision.
  • There may be some lapses in organisation.
  • The response is mainly expressed in your own words (where appropriate) but there may be reliance on the words of the text.
  • Errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[15 marks]

Question 2a

a)

Identify a word or phrase from the text which suggests the same idea as the words underlined:

(i) distract herself = take her mind away. [1 marks]

(ii) dragged Ch’idzigyaak and Sa’s belongings = pulled the two elder women’s possessions. [1 marks]

(iii) agreement was successful = arrangement worked well[1 marks]

(iv) both had personality faults = shared a character flaw. [1 marks]

Question 2b

b)

Using your own words, explain what the writer means by each of the words underlined:

(i) gathered = Congregated/assembled/came together [1 marks]

(ii) flickering = Quivering/burning or shining unsteadily [1 marks]

(iii) contribute = Share the work or burden/work collectively or collaboratively/Share responsibility/assist or support or help each other  [1 marks]

Question 2c

c)

Use one example from the text below to explain how the writer suggests the chief’s thoughts and feelings at the time of the announcement.

Answers might include:

  • “In a loud, clear voice” – suggests the chief thought he needed to project authority and strong leadership by speaking powerfully
  • “made a sudden announcement”  – suggests the chief wanted to get the bad news over with quickly and without a dramatic build up; he may have thought the immediacy might make it easier for him to be unemotional
  • “‘The council and I have arrived at a decision” – implies the chief wanted to share responsibility for the decision, suggesting he may have felt guilty about it; he may also have wanted to deflect/apportion some of the blame to others
  • “The chief paused as if to find the strength” – suggests he found making the announcement difficult and required courage; implies he felt uncomfortable making the announcement and found it challenging to deliver; subtly describes his nerves and suggests he found it more difficult than he wanted to let on
  • ”We are going to have to leave the old ones” – the imperative suggests he wanted the tribe to know they have no choice
  • “His eyes quickly scanned the crowd for reactions.” – (image) describes how he looked for people’s reactions, possibly for any sign of conflict of trouble; suggesting he was aware of a possible rebellion, or perhaps a show of emotions from the tribe

3 marks for an appropriate example followed by a detailed and convincing explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings

2 marks for an appropriate example followed by a basic explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings

1 mark for an example followed by a partial explanation of how the writer suggests Mark’s experiences and feelings.

[3 marks]

Question 2d

d)

Explain how the writer uses language to convey meaning and to create effect in these paragraphs. Choose three examples of words or phrases from each paragraph to support your answer. Your choices should include the use of imagery.

The moment the crowd respond to the chief’s announcement in paragraph 7, beginning ‘The starkness of the primitive land…’

  • starkness – barren, harsh, emphasises how the emptiness of the land contributes to the difficult lives of the people
  • primitive land – suggests something basic, new, unformed/undeveloped.  Also links to the idea of ancient people and history
  • Like the younger, more able wolves – (image) the people were ruthless, harsh.  Also suggests ferociousness and the notion of pack mentality/tribalism
  • shun the old leader of the pack – to reject cruelly – implication of having out-served usefulness, lack of respect/gratitude These two choices may need to be combined
  • (without) the extra burden – something unwanted, heavy, holding people back; dehumanises women

Example top-grade answer:

In paragraph seven, the use of the word “starkness” to describe the landscape shows it is barren and empty.  It links to the starkness of the people’s existence and emphasises their harsh, difficult life.  Describing the people as “Like the younger, more able wolves”  shows them to be brutal and ruthless.  It also reminds us of the pack mentality and tribalism of these people.  To continue the simile, they “shun the old leader of the pack” which suggests a cruel rejection of the old women, and a lack of respect or gratitude towards them.   It suggests they have out-served their usefulness and reminds us again of the harsh and uncompromising nature of the people’s lives.

The chief’s impression of the crowd’s reaction in paragraph 9, beginning ‘The chief understood why…’

  • cause an uproar – suggests chaos, dissent, disruption to community
  • weak and beaten members of the community – (image)mentally less strong, downtrodden, suggests hierarchy (oxymoron with “community”?
  • wave of panic – (image) spreads through community, unstoppable force, powerful, destructive
  • cruelty and brutality – harsh nouns, emphasises fragility of community and “every man for himself attitude (NB – not convinced by my explanation here)

Example top-grade answer:

In paragraph nine, it states that something said or done wrongly could “cause an uproar”, meaning to bring chaos or disruption to the community.  It helps to contribute to the idea throughout the paragraph that the community is in fact quite fragile.  This is demonstrated by the “cruelty and brutality” that could follow the “wave of panic”.  The metaphor shows that fear would sweep the community and implies it would be an unstoppable, destructive force.  The harsh nouns reinforce the idea that to fight for survival people will put themselves first and the community could break down. It suggests that there is in fact little common spirit.

13-15 marks:

  • Wide-ranging discussion of judiciously selected language with some high quality comments that add meaning and associations to words/phrases in both parts of the text, and demonstrate the writer’s reasons for using them.
  • Tackles imagery with some precision and imagination.
  • There is clear evidence that the candidate understands how language works.

10-12 marks:

  • Explanations are given of carefully selected words and phrases.
  • Explanations of meanings within the context of the text are secure and effects are identified in both parts of the text.
  • Images are recognised as such and the response goes some way to explaining them.
  • There is some evidence that the candidate understands how language works.

7-9 marks:

  • A satisfactory attempt is made to select appropriate words and phrases.
  • The response mostly gives meanings of words and any attempt to suggest and explain effects is basic or very general.
  • One half of the text may be better addressed than the other.

[15 marks]

Question 3

Example top-grade answer:

It was an extremely cold winter’s day, even by Alaskan standards. The people of the tribe had huddled around some fires to keep warm, but the fires were just about surviving – as were they. I could only see in front of me, because the furs of my coat were limiting my view. Although the announcement was short, I felt terrible. I wanted it to be finished as quickly as possible. I thought that would be best for everyone; no long build up – just deliver the news as clearly as possible. I had to stop for a moment to gather my composure – I knew I needed to appear strong.

I was struck at how still everybody was. I looked around to see any signs of rebellion or unpleasantness; fortunately there wasn’t any, perhaps only because nobody had the energy. Some looked as though they were expecting it. They all just sat very still, even the poor women’s family. I particularly wanted to see how Ch’idzigyaak’s daughter and grandson reacted to the news, but they were also very still.

I obviously felt very guilty, I cared for them very much; I couldn’t manage to look at them once I delivered the news. But I also knew it was necessary – it was a very difficult time and we were all struggling to survive. I also felt concern for the rest of the tribe – I didn’t want fights to break out or for us to waste energy on a rebellion so I wanted to move on quickly.  I’d like to think the two women were stronger than they made out, and that perhaps they survived the winter and joined another band. Although, I also know they were used to other people carrying their things and setting up shelters – they may not have had the skills or strength to do those things themselves. So I worry those poor women perished on that cold, unforgiving land. The thought still haunts me to this day.

10-12

  • The response demonstrates a competent reading of the text with some evidence of basic evaluation or analysis.
  • A good range of ideas is evident.
  • Some ideas are developed but the ability to sustain them may not be consistent.
  • There is frequent, helpful supporting detail, contributing to a clear sense of purpose.
  • All three bullets are covered.
  • An appropriate voice is used.

7-9:

  • The text has been read reasonably well.
  • A range of straightforward ideas is offered.
  • Opportunities for development are rarely taken.
  • Supporting detail is present but there may be some mechanical use of the text.
  • There is uneven focus on the bullets.
  • The voice is plain.

Writing/Structure/Order marks:

9-10:

  • Effective register for audience and purpose.
  • The language of the response sounds convincing and consistently appropriate.
  • Ideas are firmly expressed in a wide range of effective and/or interesting language.
  • Structure and sequence are sound throughout.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar almost always accurate.

7-8:

  • Some awareness of an appropriate register for audience and purpose.
  • Language is mostly fluent and there is clarity of expression.
  • There is a sufficient range of vocabulary to express ideas with subtlety and precision.
  • The response is mainly well structured and well sequenced.
  • Spelling, punctuation and grammar generally accurate.

5-6 marks:

  • Language is clear but comparatively plain and/or factual, expressing little opinion.
  • Ideas are rarely extended, but explanations are adequate.
  • Some sections are quite well sequenced but there may be flaws in structure.
  • Minor, but more frequent, errors of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

[25 marks]

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