AQA GCSE Biology

Revision Notes

7.1.2 Abiotic Factors

Types of Abiotic Factors

  • In Biology, ‘abiotic’ means non-living. An abiotic factor is a non-living factor
  • Some abiotic factors which can affect a  community are shown in the table below:

Abiotic factors that affect a community

Abiotic factors that affect a community table, IGCSE & GCSE Biology revision notes

Effect of Abiotic Factors

  • You should be able to extract and interpret information from charts, graphs and tables relating to the effect of abiotic factors on organisms within a community

Example exam question

Plants of the same species were grown in tanks with different CO2 levels. Their height was measured after 3 weeks and an average taken:The effect of CO2 concentration on plant graph, IGCSE & GCSE Biology revision notes

Graph showing the effect of CO2 concentration on plant height

What conclusion can you draw from this graph about the effect of CO2 concentration on plant growth rate? Explain your answer.

 

Example exam answer

As CO2 concentration increases, average plant height also increases. For example, at 5% CO2, average plant height was 10cm, but at 30% CO2, average plant height was 60cm. This shows that the higher the CO2 concentration, the greater the plant growth rate. This is because CO2 is used by plants for photosynthesis, which allows the plant to produce glucose for energy to grow.

Exam Tip

When answering questions that refer to a chart, graph or table, remember to reference specific figures from the data to support your answer, as seen in the example above.

Author: Jenna

Jenna studied at Cardiff University before training to become a science teacher at the University of Bath specialising in Biology (although she loves teaching all three sciences at GCSE level!). Teaching is her passion, and with 10 years experience teaching across a wide range of specifications – from GCSE and A Level Biology in the UK to IGCSE and IB Biology internationally – she knows what is required to pass those Biology exams.
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